Public opinion

Canadian Public Opinion Bivariate Statistics Exercise

If you use these materials, please include the following citation.
Renan Levine, Raza Rizvi, 2012, "Canadian Public Opinion Bivariate Statistics Exercise", http://opossem.org/content/canadian-public-opinion-bivariate-statistics-exercise
Type of Material: 
Problem Set
Creative Commons License: 
CC BY-NC-SA 3.0
Level: 
undergrad
Level: 
secondary

A second assignment used in an introduction to Canadian politics course. Versions of this assignment have also been used in research design and intro to US politics. This assignment builds off of the univariate assignment and requires the students to run a cross-tabulation and interpret the results (including Chi-square and measures of association). The intructions are lengthy, and designed for students to follow on their own with minimal demonstration. I used the SDA version in class, but include a SPSS version (completed by Raza Rizvi) here. The first set of questions are all multiple choice and can be grade automatically, like as a quiz on Blackboard. The latter questions allow students to choose their own variables and run an original analysis. A third assignment, requiring the students to run a t-test and/or an ANOVA will be uploaded soon. In this course, these asignments scaffolded a short public opinion bivariate research paper, but in other courses, they were a stand-alone activity.

Co-Author(s): 

Canadian Public Opinion Univariate Statistics Exercise

If you use these materials, please include the following citation.
Renan Levine, , 2012, "Canadian Public Opinion Univariate Statistics Exercise", http://opossem.org/content/canadian-public-opinion-univariate-statistics-exercise
Type of Material: 
Problem Set
Creative Commons License: 
CC BY-NC-SA 3.0
Level: 
undergrad
Level: 
secondary

An assignment I used in an introduction to Canadian Politics course that required the students to go on-line to explore public opinion data from the Canadian Election Survey. This version has the students use a web-based analysis program called SDA and data that is freely available through the University of Toronto. These analyses can be completed through any browser. The instructions are lengthy and are designed  for students to follow without any introduction to the software (the software is that easy). The questions are all multiple choice, so they can be graded automatically through course management software like Blackboard. An SPSS version will follow. These questions are not specific to SDA.

2008 Canadian Election Study Small/Student Version

If you use these materials, please include the following citation.
Renan Levine, Raza Rizvi, 2012, "2008 Canadian Election Study Small/Student Version", http://opossem.org/content/2008-canadian-election-study-smallstudent-version
Type of Material: 
Dataset
Creative Commons License: 
CC BY-NC-SA 3.0
Level: 
grad
Level: 
undergrad
Level: 
secondary

The 2008 Canadian Election Study was led by Elisabeth Gidengil, Joanna Everitt, Patrick Fournier, and Neil Nevitte. The study consisted of three surveys: a pre-election telephone survey (variables with the prefix ‘cps’), a post-election survey (prefix ‘pes’) and a mailback survey (‘mbs’). The data from this study, and other Canadian election surveys are hosted by the Canadian Opinion Research Archive at Queen’s University at  http://www.queensu.ca/cora/ces.html. This  version of the survey contains a selection of 50 variables from the survey and 1,196 observations randomly selected from the sample while maintaining the original percentage of respondents to the study from five provinces and regions (Quebec, Ontario, BC, Atlantic provinces and the prairies (Alberta, Manitoba and Saskachewan). This selection of variables and observations can be used by students using Small STATA and Student SPSS, which limits the total number of variables and/or observations that can be analyzed. The selection of variables (including the modification/creation of a few variables), the sampling observations and the codebook was completed for classroom use by Renan Levine and Raza Rizvi of the University of Toronto – Scarborough. All research should cite the original dataset.

Co-Author(s): 
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