foreign policy

Discussion guide--quantitative methods and American politics--

If you use these materials, please include the following citation.
Emily Clough, , 2013, "Discussion guide--quantitative methods and American politics--", http://opossem.org/content/discussion-guide-quantitative-methods-and-american-politics
Type of Material: 
Class Activities
Creative Commons License: 
CC BY-NC-SA 3.0
Level: 
undergrad

 http://opossem.org/sites/all/themes/opossem/images/featured-bg.gif); background-color: rgb(163, 197, 134); color: rgb(255, 255, 255); font-size: 13px; border-left-width: 1px; border-left-color: rgb(255, 255, 255); width: 449px; background-position: 0% 100%; background-repeat: repeat no-repeat;"> http://opossem.org/sites/all/themes/opossem/images/featured-bg.gif); background-color: rgb(163, 197, 134); color: rgb(255, 255, 255); font-size: 13px; border-left-width: 1px; border-left-color: rgb(255, 255, 255); width: 218px; background-position: 0% 100%; background-repeat: repeat no-repeat;">  This discussion guide highlights quantitative elements in two articles on US foreign policy.  The discussion guide is organised by level of quantitative understanding, and includes some classroom activities.   It is based on two articles: Paul Gronke et al.  2009.  “US Public Opinion on Torture, 2001-2009”  PS 43: 3 and Jacobs and Page. 2005. “Who influences US foreign policy?”  American Political Science Review 99: 1. It was written by Matthew Hill (University of London), James Bilsland (Newcastle), Barbara Morazzani (Birmingham).  It was prepared as a part of a workshop funded by the Economic and Social Research Council, grant ES/J01186X/1, PI:  Emily Clough (Newcastle University). 

Discussion guide--quantitative methods and American politics--

If you use these materials, please include the following citation.
Emily Clough, , 2013, "Discussion guide--quantitative methods and American politics--", http://opossem.org/content/discussion-guide-quantitative-methods-and-american-politics
Type of Material: 
Class Activities
Creative Commons License: 
CC BY-NC-SA 3.0
Level: 
undergrad

 http://opossem.org/sites/all/themes/opossem/images/featured-bg.gif); background-color: rgb(163, 197, 134); color: rgb(255, 255, 255); font-size: 13px; border-left-width: 1px; border-left-color: rgb(255, 255, 255); width: 449px; background-position: 0% 100%; background-repeat: repeat no-repeat;"> http://opossem.org/sites/all/themes/opossem/images/featured-bg.gif); background-color: rgb(163, 197, 134); color: rgb(255, 255, 255); font-size: 13px; border-left-width: 1px; border-left-color: rgb(255, 255, 255); width: 218px; background-position: 0% 100%; background-repeat: repeat no-repeat;">  This discussion guide highlights quantitative elements in two articles on US foreign policy.  The discussion guide is organised by level of quantitative understanding, and includes some classroom activities.   It is based on two articles: Paul Gronke et al.  2009.  “US Public Opinion on Torture, 2001-2009”  PS 43: 3 and Jacobs and Page. 2005. “Who influences US foreign policy?”  American Political Science Review 99: 1. It was written by Matthew Hill (University of London), James Bilsland (Newcastle), Barbara Morazzani (Birmingham).  It was prepared as a part of a workshop funded by the Economic and Social Research Council, grant ES/J01186X/1, PI:  Emily Clough (Newcastle University). 

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